Why I’m Sick and Tired of Gnome Shell

I’ve been using Gnome Shell (Gnome 3) exclusively for 2 weeks today, and while I do have a few good words to say about it… today’s the day I’m switching to KDE once and for all.

Gnome Shell is Defective By Design, and I’m here to tell you why.

NetworkManager

Looks 2.0. Acts like 0.1

  • I can’t disconnect from a Wireless Network unless I turn off Wifi entirely.
  • I can’t view my current IP unless I click Network Settings
  • There’s no longer any way to connect to a hidden wireless network.
    • Found it. It’s hidden under Network Settings, click the Network name, then click on Other.
  • I can’t modify the Wired options unless I actually plug a cable.

And before you tell me it’s an unfinished product, these decisions are there by design, and as far as I know, I can’t right click anything to prompt for more options.

Alt Tab vs Alt | (The key above Tab)

I often find myself with dozens of LibreOffice PPTs open, or dozens of GIMP images open, or dozens of Gedit windows open. Trying to Alt | between the windows is an absolute nightmare. I know Shift-Alt-| helps you go back and forward between the windows, but why should i have to switch through them, when they change their order for no apparent reason?

I know pressing the Super key brings an overview with all the windows open. At one point, my overview looked like this:

Try to find what you’re looking for.

One quick way to fix this? Bring back the old Task Switcher, at the bottom of the screen. Where it’s been the past 10 or so years.

Add programs to the menu

For some insane reason, Fedora never seems to install Alacarte on Gnome by default. Or maybe I’m crazy for actually using it?

I tried to add an Eclipse instance to the menu. Thought right clicking might help, but no luck. Dragging the icon? No luck either.

Alacarte lets you modify the menu, but unless you know the app’s name, and install it yourself, you’re S.O.L.

Notification Area should be visible *always*

How long ago did someone mention me on IRC?

The notification area does not do its job. If you missed the notification, it hides and does not remind you of a missed notifications.

It should always be visible. This is probably my biggest annoyance.

Right Click on Desktop Can’t change the Wallpaper

Once upon a time, back in Fedora… 14? I was able to Right Click the Desktop, and change the Wallpaper from there. That’s gone now.

Apparently if I open the Activities overview, and click on Applications, I can’t find any way to change the background, but apparently typing “Background” on the search box finds a hidden app that lets you change it. FFS! Hidden!

Update: I’m an idiot, there’s a way to change Background by opening the Gnome Control Center, which I can’t find without using gnome-control-center on a terminal, or going to Network Settings, and clicking All Settings.

I really miss TimeZones

Another Gnome 2.32 feature I miss on Gnome 3 was the ability to see other timezones by clicking on the Clock panel.

I wish someone made an extension for that. I really miss it, and would’ve been handy it now that I’ve started the GSOC.

Update: Stephane wrote in the comments that this is his GSOC Project! Looking forward to it on Gnome 3.2!

Defaults are just insane

Closing the lid automatically suspends the laptop.

If it wasn’t for Gnome-Tweak-Tool, I wouldn’t have lasted on Gnome-Shell nearly as long as I have.

Tweak Tool lets you change a lot of Gnome’s defaults, like its fonts, the lack of minimize/maximize buttons on top, and even showing the Date in the clock (Which isn’t there by default). Tweak Tool even lets you let Nautilus manage the desktop again, adding Icons back to your screen.

Trying to turn off the computer the first time was downright surprising. I clicked my name and Suspend showed up. Power Off wasn’t an option. There’s a package called gnome-shell-extensions-alternative-status-menu (Isn’t that a mouthful?) that brings back sanity onto that menu.

Battery Monitor annoyance

Hah, as I was writing the closing words, my computer just alerted me that I have 7% battery remaining. There used to be colors up there. I would’ve loved colors warning me ahead of time that I’ll probably need a charger soon. As soon as the “5 minutes of battery remaining showed up”, I panicked and raced for the battery charger.

Could you please warn me before? Maybe add colors onto that icon? Or would that break the “beautiful design decisions”?

Update: Perhaps use “battery cells” on the battery, like cellphones do, that way it would be easier to distinguish between 75% full and 25% full.

Closing Words

Gnome’s “Simplicity” is down right insulting to a computer enthusiast. It makes it impossible to do simple tasks that used to flow naturally, and it’s made dozens of bizarre “design decisions”, like hiding Power Off behind the “Alt” key.

The lack of a taskbar, and hiding the notification area are extremely annoying, and the only reason I lasted this long is because I don’t have time to switch from Desktop-to-Desktop mid-week.

I think KDE is done re-installing. Good riddance, Gnome 3.

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Posted in Life, Rant
45 comments on “Why I’m Sick and Tired of Gnome Shell
  1. Hi Juan,

    Did you try using workspaces? From your screenshot it appears you aren’t, and we specifically wanted to make them significantly easier and nicer to use than they were in GNOME 2. So for example, you can drag a number of libreoffice documents to a separate workspace, and this cuts down on the number of windows in the overview.

    As far as the notification area – you should see the notification when you enter the overview.

    • Nushio says:

      I intend to talk about the things I *loved* about Gnome Shell too (I’m drafting it atm).

      Workspaces was one of the things I adore about Shell.

      I know the notification area is visible on the overview, I don’t use the overview when I’m concentrating on a task. I expect a tiny pidgin icon on *any* corner to light up and remind me something needs my attention. I could blame Pidgin developers, or I could blame Gnome’s decision to remove importance from the notification area.

      I chose to blame Gnome.

      • Tyler Hampton says:

        I agree entirely. I was playing Wesnoth and got up to go to the bathroom. For thirty minutes I didn’t realize that my mother was had sent me a message over Facebook. Also, is it me, or is the notification pop-up not eye catching enough? It sort of catches my attention but, at the same time, it doesn’t. It’s more like I recognized that there is a a notification but not of what. Perhaps it’s because the pop-up takes up so little screen real estate. Customizability is a huge problem. Yes, user interfaces need to be designed so that they’re easy to use but power users shouldn’t be turned away either. I hope that improves.

  2. Digitalus says:

    This article almost exactly describes my feelings about GNOME 3 (and it’s even worse with unity in new Ubuntu). They are defective by design and way to dumbed-down. So I also started looking for alternatives and starting to like KDE Plasma more and more every minute. In fact I believe now that KDE Plasma is what the other two desktops should be from the very start. Sure it is not perfect, far from it, but a lot better, yeah, I found out it is better than my previous favourite desktop (GNOME 2).

  3. Kevin Kofler says:

    Welcome to the KDE world! :-)

    Colored systray icons aren’t the default under KDE Plasma either these days, so you’ll probably be interested in this: http://kde-look.org/content/show.php?content=134914

    But for everything else you complained about, Plasma does the sane thing out of the box. And it tends to be much easier to tweak if you don’t like the defaults than GNOME.

    • Nushio says:

      I don’t really *need* colored icons, I just need a visible battery indicator. It could use small battery cell divisions on cellphones for all I care, that’d be enough to notice the difference between 50% and 15%.

      • Kevin Kofler says:

        The small divisions are what Plasma’s monochrome icons use.

        And actually, I just checked, they even switch from the usual monochrome white to red when the battery goes really low (whereas gnome-shell just stubbornly sticks to white).

        The battery indicators in my colored set (which are based on Oxygen icons, as the rest of the set) actually look quite similar, except they use green instead of white.

        • Rahul Sundaram says:

          “And actually, I just checked, they even switch from the usual monochrome white to red when the battery goes really low (whereas gnome-shell just stubbornly sticks to white).”

          This is incorrect. It turns to red in GNOME Shell as well

          • Nushio says:

            Oh, My fault. I swear I never saw it turn red. I took that battery indicator picture after it warned me that i had 7% battery, if it was red afterwards, I don’t know, I plugged the charger immediately.

            On KDE, I can adjust the battery warnings, and I set mine to warn me at 30% and 15%. I bet there’s a way to do the same on Gnome, but I’d have to fiddle with gconf-editor to find it.

  4. I understand your position about the multi-timezone clock, I use it a lot too. But! But, this is why I got accepted into the Google Summer of Code: Location-aware GNOME Shell, will hopefully bring back the timezones and a weather applet. I hope you’ll switch back! :)

    • Nushio says:

      Sweet! Lack of a Timezones is something I dearly miss, but I knew someone would eventually write the extension for it.

      Glad it’s happening sooner and not later! Good luck with your GSoC!

  5. Elad says:

    >Apparently if I open the Activities overview, and click on Applications, I can’t find any way to >change the background, but apparently typing “Background” on the search box finds a hidden >app that lets you change it. FFS! Hidden!
    Actually it is not hidden. Click on your user name, then click system settings, and click on Background.
    Is that so hard?

    • Nushio says:

      I used Gnome Shell 2 weeks and never did I ever click that button, not even by curiosity.

      What does that say about the design / location?

      • nicu says:

        what it say? wrong location :) “system settings” is something you expect an admin to use, while the background is a mere user preference… another symptom of “defective by design”, assuming single-user mobile devices, not workstations.

        • Kevin Kofler says:

          I think his issue is not that the setting is under “System Settings”, but that the user name doesn’t remotely look like a clickable button.

          • Nushio says:

            The Username does look like a clickable button, at least when coming from Gnome 2.x. The only time I visited that button was to power off or logout, I guess I never bothered clicking anything else under there.

        • Allan Day says:

          Hi nicu,

          As a member of the design team, I can categorically tell you that ‘single-user mobile devices’ were never assumed. That is simply untrue.

          None of the participants in my user tests had any problems understanding the meaning of ‘system settings’.

      • Allan Day says:

        I’m surprised to hear these comments about the discoverability of system settings. I did user testing on the shell and none of my participants had any problems finding how to change the desktop background.

  6. Allan Day says:

    Hey Juan. Sorry to hear you’ve had some issues with GNOME 3. Let’s go through this…

    Network
    Is this really by design?! I’m part of the design team, and I’m not aware of that! Why do you want to disconnect from a wi-fi network but keep wi-fi active? If there’s a good reason, file a bug. :)

    Alt-Tab
    You’re right about the design limitation of the window picker here, but GNOME 3 is no worse than any of the alternatives in this respect (including window lists). I’m sure we’ll be working on improving the usability of the window picker in these situations. In the mean time, you can use workspaces.

    Add programs to the menu
    Why would you want to do that?

    Notification area
    The notification area (we call it the messaging tray) does not hide all the time. It is visible in the overview, and it pops up after a period of inactivity. The reason it works this way is to stop you getting distracted from your current task. There’s a lot of convincing research that this is a big problem for many users. This design *really* improves the user experience for most people.

    Time zones
    As you’ve seen, that’s on track to being added. (Remember that it took GNOME 2 a while to get this!)

    Right click on desktop
    https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=647845

    Defaults
    We’re talking about one or two defaults here… I’m not going to retread that ground, other than to say that I’ve found that, with a bit of practice, using suspend and not power off gives a really nice experience.

    Battery monitor
    The designs include the use of colour here. Some bugs have been fixed wrt to these icons. If it doesn’t get fixed for you, it would be great if you could file a bug.

    Hope that helps. It is a .0, remember! We’ve already released a whole bunch of bug fixes, and many of the things you’ve mentioned will hopefully be sorted out in 3.2.

    • Nushio says:

      Hey Allan! I really hope I’m not considered a troll for the above writeup, I’m a *really* big fan of Gnome, and I think I did give Shell a good try before writing that, not just a quick 30-minute usage review like some others do.

      About the Network Manager… I deal with Avaya servers on a daily basis, which means I have to connect my laptop to their wired ports. Some require setting my IP to 192.11.13.6, others to something different, and then there’s DHCP. Gnome 2.32 handled this beautifully, Gnome 3? Not so much, I can’t click ‘Options’ until after I plugged the cable, as an example, this means I couldn’t do a quick check on what IP was used for which server when someone asked me.

      I also need to disconnect the wifi because when I plug the cable, I want it to connect to that server, and sometimes, I get conflicting IPs because of the different server scenarios. Maybe I’m the only guy that needs this, which is why I probably won’t file a bug report about this.

      Alt-Tab: On KDE, there’s this option to choose whether the Alt-Tab mechanism reorders everything by usage or on a stack. I prefer stack. Usage is probably fine by most though. Having options rules.

      Adding Programs to the Menu: I really hope you were being sarcastic here… Again, I use a lot of Avaya software, in particular, Dialog Designer for Eclipse. I decided to set up an alternative Eclipse install (Downloaded the .zip from Eclipse.org, uncompressed, that’s all it takes to install Eclipse) so as to not ‘poison’ my Eclipse with DD. I wanted this Eclipse install on the menu. On Gnome 2.32, I could simply drag the icon onto the Gnome Panel, voila! Shortcut made.

      Notification Area: If you read the ‘kind words’ I wrote, you’ll see that I actually appreciate the fact that the notification area is mostly hidden, as someone with a self-diagnosed ADD, I sure got distracted less, however I do expect a pidgin icon visible at all times to see if someone was pinging me or not, and sadly, instead of having a quick glimpse, I have to press “Super” to see the icon, and I don’t go into the Overview nearly as often as I glimpsed at the Pidgin icon back in 2.32. In fact, if I have to go to the Overview every minute to see if someone’s calling me, I have to say that the design has failed.

      TIme Zones: Yeah, this was something I dearly missed, but not something I’d lose my sleep over, I knew it was coming back eventually. :-)

      Right click on Desktop: Glad that’s been taken care of! :D

      Defaults: Listen, I’ve dealt with Gnome’s defaults for over 6 years. One of my biggest complaints was Nautilus opening a new window every time I opened a folder, unless I went into Preferences and checked some checkmark. (This was fixed on 2.30, IIRC). What I’d ask for is Gnome-Tweak-Tools to be a built-in tool, not a third-party one. To have Gnome acknowledge that while their defaults are “the best there are” (And I’m kinda being sarcastic here), that there’s an option to change every decision with a small tweak or two. We’re already able to tweak every decision if you know which gconf-settings to modify, but we shouldn’t have to fiddle with that!

      Battery Monitor: Again, on KDE, there’s an option to change how often you want to be notified, I set mine to warn me at 30%, set it to low at 15% and to critically low and Hibernate at 5%. KDE also uses 5 battery cells to indicate battery percentage. It doesn’t have to use color, it just has to be visible.

      Finally, I know 3.0 is a .0 release, however I felt that the major difference between KDE’s 4.0 and Gnome’s 3.0 was that KDE devs said KDE was incomplete, where as Gnome devs kept saying that what’s missing from Gnome was stripped by design, and that’s the part that made me sad.

      • Jason says:

        You aren’t the only one with this problem. I discovered this issue today when working with a client’s DSL modem and a Cisco ASA 5505. The DSL model wasn’t handing out DHCP and I couldn’t even change the network settings at all by clicking on the “options” button until the link was actually ACTIVE! Very annoying! I had to manually create an ifcfg-em1 file and us ifup to actually configure the network device to use with this modem.

        So go ahead and file that bug! :)

        • Nushio says:

          Wow, that really trumps my issues and can see how big of a nightmare it would be for ‘the average guy’. I’ll go ahead and file the bug report later.

      • Allan Day says:

        I don’t have time to comment on all of this, I’m afraid…

        By and large, GNOME has very good defaults. We’ve always aspired to create something that Just Works without the need to tweak. That’s a noble aim, in my view, and it’s one that we’ve largely achieved.

        As for the IM notifications, I don’t think it makes sense to special case their display. We have a neat separation between system and applications in the design of the shell, and I don’t think a lot of people would benefit from having notification status constantly displayed.

        For the other issues, just file bugs where appropriate or be patient. I’m sure solutions will appear if there’s a general need for the things you want. None of them look insurmountable to me.

        I’ve filed the battery icon issue here: https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=649257

        • Elder-Geek says:

          “I don’t think it makes sense to special case their display.”

          Thank you for all of your hard work on Gnome. I really mean that. However, this is exactly the attitude behind my decision not to run Gnome. You do not think it makes sense, and for 90% of the users that might make sense. But if you allowed there to be configuration options, you may keep part of that 10% as Gnome users. There is also the possibility of someone finding some other cool use for those options.

          Where there is room to do things several different ways, recognizing different people have different needs, Fluxbox, XFCE, KDE, LXDE, etc, etc, etc, allow end users latitude in what options are available and how they configure their desktop. Whereas Gnomes attitude is “This is what is best for you, it is best for you in the long run. You will like it and thank us later. We have usability studies to prove it.”

          I keep checking back to see if things have changed, but they only seem to be more restrictive. So I vote with my feet. I run and support (with code, documentation and helping users) other desktops.

    • Joseph says:

      ” The reason [notification] works this way is to stop you getting distracted from your current task. ”

      The whole point of a notification is to distract you from your current task! :-)

    • donald A. Sime says:

      re: “Add programs to the menu
      Why would you want to do that?”

      Oh that is perfect. :-)

  7. Matěj Cepl says:

    No, I don’t believe the design is hewn into the stone tablets. And yes I am persuaded that it is a version 1.0 and there will be bug fixes both in design and in the implementation. More on this on http://luther.ceplovi.cz/blog/2011/03/few-thoughts-on-gnome-3/

  8. “where as Gnome devs kept saying that what’s missing from Gnome was stripped by design, and that’s the part that made me sad.”

    This just isn’t true, as far as I know. I haven’t seen anyone make such a blanket statement anywhere. I’ve seen this said about some specific changes; I’ve seen exactly the opposite said about other specific changes.

    “these decisions are there by design”

    I don’t believe this is entirely the case; it would help if you backed that up with some kind of support. I know the current support for hidden networks is rushed and may well change. In general Shell’s NM interface is acknowledged to be incomplete at this time.

    “One quick way to fix this? Bring back the old Task Switcher, at the bottom of the screen. Where it’s been the past 10 or so years.”

    You don’t explain how it would be any better. In your screenshot, there are 18 windows. Unless your monitor about 5,000 pixels wide, they would be even _harder_ to distinguish on a panel-based window list.

    “Add programs to the menu” – you can also create a .desktop file for whatever out-of-repository app you want to add to the menus. It’d be easy for your alternative-Eclipse-install case, for instance – just copy the Eclipse one, change the name and path, and you’re good.

    “Update: I’m an idiot, there’s a way to change Background by opening the Gnome Control Center, which I can’t find without using gnome-control-center on a terminal”

    it’s in the user menu, ‘System Settings’.

    I kind of have the same problem with notifications, but it really doesn’t bother me much. You don’t have to go to the overview to check notifications, either – you can just mouse over the lower-right corner of the screen. (I wonder if a neat ‘trick’ to implement here would be a keyboard shortcut which made the notification area appear?) In practice, I wind up just alt-tabbing to xchat every ten minutes or so to see if anyone pinged me.

  9. Gerben Welter says:

    FYI, you can disconnect from a network by selecting it again from the dropdown list. I admit it isn’t intuitive, I stumbled on it by mistake.

  10. Chunkyboy says:

    Lucid Lynx 10.04 with gnome 2 is about as close to user friendly perfect as an OS gets.
    The more diversion from this, the more incorrect. (in my opinion).

  11. krpalospo says:

    definitely nothing like XFCE is simple, powerfull and can be as simple and as complex…

  12. Orzech says:

    @Allan

    “None of the participants in my user tests had any problems understanding the meaning of ‘system settings’.

    I’m surprised to hear these comments about the discoverability of system settings. I did user testing on the shell and none of my participants had any problems finding how to change the desktop background.”

    The best “participant”/tester or whatever you call it is user, period. If Nicu, Juan or anybody else who have used your product for some extended time says something is in the wrong place, then IT IS IN WRONG PLACE. Making such excuses as you is simply BS, sorry.

    “Network
    (…) Why do you want to disconnect from a wi-fi network but keep wi-fi active? If there’s a good reason, file a bug.”

    Because he wants to. It is ridiculous to make your users justifying such obvious needs, especially in case of functionality taken away from them just because you don’t see a good reason to have it implemented.

    “Alt+Tab
    You’re right about the design limitation of the window picker here, but GNOME 3 is no worse than any of the alternatives in this respect (including window lists).”

    Is no worse, because you say that? Window list makes window switching simply faster, than both alt+tab and window picker. And even if it doesn’t, still it is wrong to force users to throw away their habits.

    “Add programs to the menu
    Why would you want to do that?”

    You gotta be kidding me! Why would one configure anything at all?! Juan needs this as well as any other person willing to use non-packaged software for instance…

    “Notification area
    (..) The reason it works this way is to stop you getting distracted from your current task.”

    Notification, as its name says is meant to NOTIFY me about something. And I want to be notified until I realize I missed something. If one doesn’t want to be notified, he/she turns off his/her commu. or chooses “offline” mode.

    “There’s a lot of convincing research that this is a big problem for many users. This design *really* improves the user experience for most people.”
    Lot of convincing research, wow. Then why I do miss that too? Again, now there are two of us. And I doubt it’s only two. And telling us that it improves user experience for most people doesn’t make it functional for us at all.

    “Defaults
    (…) I’m not going to retread that ground, other than to say that I’ve found that, with a bit of practice, using suspend and not power off gives a really nice experience.”

    You you and again you. Isn’t it too arrogant to believe, that if YOU think something is nice then everybody in the world thinks the same way? Hiding power off menu item is so stupid, that I won’t even waste my time to explain that to you.

    “We’ve always aspired to create something that Just Works without the need to tweak. That’s a noble aim, in my view, and it’s one that we’ve largely achieved.”

    Adding customization options doesn’t break the “Just Works” thing.

    “As for the IM notifications, I don’t think it makes sense to special case their display. We have a neat separation between system and applications in the design of the shell, and I don’t think a lot of people would benefit from having notification status constantly displayed.”

    Once again, YOU don’t think… But there are people that think it makes sense. Do you create Gnome for yourself, or for users?

    • Alejandro Nova says:

      Well, after all we all used the “/” key in the 80′s because the Visicalc developer had a bent pinky finger… The developers often develop for themselves, and that’s acceptable. OTOH, having more choices makes me to use better what I have, and customize a system for my own needs, and that’s legit too.

      My turn: please, don’t force behaviour on me that I don’t want. I reprogrammed the “DVD” key of my tx1000 laptop to bring the Plasma Dashboard, on KDE, and I assigned to it the “Keyboard Backlight” code (the tx1000 has no keyboard backlighting). When I tried to do that on GNOME 3, and I pressed that key, I obtained a pretty icon of “Keyboard Backlight” instead of the Activity panel that I wanted. Your GNOME 3 is pretty, is good, but is sealed.

  13. janechii says:

    Guys! most of these issues will be resolved when more configurations/customizations/extensions are available! You guys have like an iPhone mentality or something :-p. The GNOME community will work it out!

    I think we may be misunderstanding Allan when he said “Why would you want to do that?”. I was confused too why he would say that, but maybe he wasn’t clear on what Juan was saying. I didn’t until i read the comments. Even if that *was* his mentality, he’s not the only contributor.

  14. AlphaWolf says:

    I have very little positive to say about Gnome 3, sorry. It is pretty… but within seconds “pretty” gets in the way of “functional”. Previously to find an app, all I had to do was click on the appropriate menu and hover over the correct (and well categorized) sub-menus. Now I go to the one-corner-fits-all “Activities” button, in the top-left, then click on “Applications” a bit lower, then CLEAR to the far right and click to narrow the selection by category, then back to the middle to click on the actual app. What used to be 2 clicks and one fluid motion is now 4 clicks and a motion that takes me all over the screen. That is not easier in the least bit.

    Connecting to a hidden wireless network is terribly convoluted. Why can’t I do it by clicking on the networking icon like I used to? Why doesn’t hovering over the network icon tell me the signal strength? Speaking of signal strength — why aren’t the wireless networks sorted by signal strength in descending order? Isn’t it logical that you’d want to connect to one of the networks with the best signal? As I type this there are LITERALLY 30 wireles networks “in view”, the vast majority of which are too weak to connect to. Why should I have to click on “more” and then scroll to the bottom of the list to find the network with the best strength, which should be at the top?

    What is the point of the hidden bar at the bottom of the screen? I only came across it by accident when I tried to click on something else and it got in the way…

    Who thought it was a good idea to get rid of most of the context menus? Why castrate the right mouse button? I don’t see how this removes “clutter” or makes anything more visually appealling — and it clearly doesn’t make anything any easier. It seems like the only way to do anything anymore is to navigate a series of convoluted menus.

    I also miss minimize/maximize buttons. What used to be one click is now a minimum of two, whether it be double-clicking or right-click and then left-click. It seems the Gnome developers have confused “making it easier” with “remove/hide all the options”. It seems like Gnome 3 is designed for the least experienced 10% of computer users… which happen to be the same people who have no idea that FOSS exists…

    I’m giving KDE and XFCE each a second try. Gnome, you will be missed.

  15. janechii says:

    @AlphaWolf

    I think the main idea is to use the search feature. I use the application menu just to explore new / available apps, which i dont do often, but appreciate that the icons are nice and big. Once you know your app, you can launch it quite quickly. (Super key, then start typing a few characters).

    agreed on the hidden wireless. and sorting should be customizable.

    The hidden bar at the bottom is the notification area. It stores your notifications rather than discarding it like on prior versions of GNOME. It comes up only if you hit the bottom right corner or in the overview mode (and also occasionally and after unlocking screen). Still needs some work, but overall, i think it’s a cool idea.

    yea, context menus should be put back in throughout. this is an expected behavior. and there needs to be an easier way than gconf to put in min/max buttons.

    KDE and XFCE are great choices too! Yay choices! *a wink at apple users*

    • porcolino says:

      using a search feature? cool but i cant type. i lost my hands in a accident. so I use a trackball and an onscreenkb. gnome3 does not even have an onscreen

  16. Brandon says:

    You seriously can’t find the settings? Just click the part of the panel where it says your name, and click “system settings”….

  17. Regarding Notification Area – I think that it should stay as it is (hidden) by default BUT we need to have a simple option to set always visible to true. Another alternative is to have an extension.

  18. Victor says:

    It is really a crap. You can’t have two APPLICATIONS opened at the same time because gnome3 crashs. Gnome3-sucks and developers can’t help nor have any idea. I would use windows environment on top of gnome3.

  19. Dino says:

    I have the same complaints about Gnome 3 (I hope the developers and designers will be humble enough to listen to the end users). And, I take this opportunity to thank Allan and everybody involved in this great project to bring us something almost perfect free of charge. I hate the corporations and their empires. Thank you for your time and generous efforts!

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  1. [...] at GNOME 3.0. I haven’t written about it yet, but I find it hard to disagree with a blogger named Juan Rodriguez who wrote, “Gnome Shell is Defective By Design.” GNOME 3.0, like too many Linux/Unix interfaces, was designed by software developers for [...]

  2. [...] wailing GNOME 3.0, a “official” new GNOME bombard that’s out and about, as “Defective by Design,” Vaughan-Nichols states: “GNOME 3.0, like too many Linux/Unix interfaces, was [...]

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